Top 10 Breakfasts for Blood Sugar Control

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Are you guys eating breakfast?

Diabetes aside,  I find that most people are not having their first meal until lunch time. The need for “breaking the fast” is often debated among those in the health care field. In my opinion, because we are all unique and trying to achieve different health goals and have different health concerns I say the need for breakfast depends on the person. We certainly cannot make one blanket recommendation for everyone out there but I can say that there is evidence to support the practice of intermittent fasting (not eating food for period of 16-24 hours) as far as activating our longevity genes, supporting healthy weight, insulin sensitivity and overall health.

Personally, I need to eat breakfast. I usually wake up hungry and I love breakfast foods, It truly is my favorite meal of the day (I may have a little brunch addiction 😉 ).

Eating a balanced breakfast sets the stage for stable blood sugar during the day. Here I have some ideas plus some of my favorite (and easy) breakfasts I eat to fuel up my day!

  1. Overnight Oats: This can be a really nice and personalized breakfast. Oats are high in fiber of course, low glycemic making allowing for a nice, slow impact on glucose. Organic oats are really easy to find and are actually affordable! Throw 1 cup into your slow cooker and add your favorite items i.e raisins or dried fruit (sugar and sulfite free), chopped nuts, chia seeds or fruits. Here is what I use:
    • 1Tsp Cinnamon
    • 1Tbsp Ground Flaxseed
    • 1 Cup Unsweetened Almond Milk
    • 1 Cup Water
    • 1 Cubed Gala Apple
    • Set on low over night and wake up to the coziest smelling house  🙂
  2. Nut Butter Waffle: I am not talking about slabbing the cookie nut butter on an Eggo waffle (sorry to disappoint) but what I am suggesting is equally delicious AND convenient for those of us zooming out the door in the morning. This is a great option if you choose the right ingredients! The trick with nut butters is to avoid the added sugars and unnecessary ingredients.  Most don’t think there would be sugar in nut butter but there is. Truly, the nut butter should just have nuts and salt but unfortunately the food industry likes to make it a bit of a challenge for us health seekers. But we are SavvyBerries and we know to look at the ingredients on every packaged food before we buy it! Instructions are self – explanatory, toast and spread, so here are some brands I like:
  3. Spinach + Mushroom Omelet: This low carb option sounds simple enough, and you don’t HAVE to use mushrooms. Try any veggie you like but just add one at least. Cheese does not count and I actually encourage you to try to make it without cheese. Challenge yourself! Use Extra Virgin olive oil, sea salt, organic spinach and mushrooms maybe focus on protein and use just the egg whites.
  4. Protein Power Smoothie: Recipe and method is self-explanatory but here the focus is on the type of protein. Protein, especially whey protein has been shown to support healthy after meal glucose levels.
    • Protein Powders: Vega , Bluebonnet , Garden of Life, Jarrow Formulas
    • Measure and look at your frozen fruits! Yes, they do add sugar to frozen fruits. Use a measuring cup to scoop out the mixed fruits and if using a banana use just half (they have high cho content).
  5. Low-Carb Pancakes: For these use almond or coconut flour. Feel free to use Unsweetened non-dairy milk, I use Unsweetened Almond 🙂 Here is a nice paleo carrot cake recipe from Bob’s Red Mill to check out!
  6. Breakfast Panini:  Nice thing about this is you don’t have to have a Panini press, you can use  your stove to get the similar effect!  I have personally stopped buying bread at my house. But I realize this is not a realistic option for others. There are some nice bread options and when I did buy bread here are a few I used:
  7. Home-style Breakfast: No fuss, nothing fancy just eggs, sausage, and potatoes. Eggs truly are a nutrition powerhouse, a great source of protein, low-calorie, and low carb plus choline! Choline is ultra beneficial for brain, liver,metabolic health and so much more. According to Linus Pauling the AI for choline for men and women 19 yrs and older is 550mg/day and and 425mg/day respectively. One egg has about 250mg of choline!
    • Sausage: Applegate farms
    • Potatoes: Roasted Potatoes with Peppers and Onions from Trader Joe’s or you are more than welcome to saute some sweet / red potatoes with peppers if you have the time!
  8. PB+J Oats: Comfort food at its best! Now, you do not have to use the crock pot for this one, you can just add the oats (same recipe as above) but instead of adding honey for a sweet touch at the end add a tablespoon of your favorite nut butter and whole fruit spread!
  9. Greek Yogurt and Chia Parfait: I love the thick, creamy taste of Greek yogurt, not to mention I love being able to add whatever toppings to it depending on what I feel. For this reason I prefer to buy plain. It is so simple to throw in two (heaping scoops of plain Greek yogurt, a 1/2 tablespoon of chia seeds, whole fruits into a mason jar and off to work you go! Why is plain Greek yogurt better?  Well it is a great source of calcium and protein but also because when you buy the Greek yogurt plain you also avoid the added sugar they usually put in with the “flavors”. Take a look at all the flavored options next time you are at the store and see for yourself!
  10. Banana Museli Muffin: Baking with bananas is my thing. They are a nice source of natural sweetness and are great in baked goods. The great thing about muffins is that you can make them one day and have enough for the week! I like to add flax and oats to my muffin recipes for some nice fiber sources. Here’s a recipe from food.com to get you started!

Eating healthfully to manage blood sugar should not be a chore! You can still have delicious foods that are simple to make without spiking your sugar. If you try any of these breakfast ideas let me know, I would love to hear how they worked for you!

Happy eating my savvy berries!

 

 

 

 

 

References: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/other-nutrients/choline

 

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